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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rode my bike to work yesterday and 10 minutes before I leave to go home a pop up thunderstorm occurs. I waited the heavy down pour out and then rode the mile home in light rain. Pulled into the garage shut the bike off and went about the rest of my day. This morning I rode to work and pulled the key out that I left in over night and noticed the shiny key now has a couple spots that look like galvanic corrosion. Hind sight, I shouldn't have left my key in the ignition over night because it was wet, however we are past that. I know guys that work on locks for doors in buildings say to never put wd40 in a lock as it will attract dirt and cause issues, they always use graphite. I'm curious if anyone has any suggestions as if this is a good idea or bad idea. I would think I need to drive the moisture out of the ignition but maybe sitting outside in the 90*+ heat today will do that.
 

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Rode my bike to work yesterday and 10 minutes before I leave to go home a pop up thunderstorm occurs. I waited the heavy down pour out and then rode the mile home in light rain. Pulled into the garage shut the bike off and went about the rest of my day. This morning I rode to work and pulled the key out that I left in over night and noticed the shiny key now has a couple spots that look like galvanic corrosion. Hind sight, I shouldn't have left my key in the ignition over night because it was wet, however we are past that. I know guys that work on locks for doors in buildings say to never put wd40 in a lock as it will attract dirt and cause issues, they always use graphite. I'm curious if anyone has any suggestions as if this is a good idea or bad idea. I would think I need to drive the moisture out of the ignition but maybe sitting outside in the 90*+ heat today will do that.
When riding in the rain all motorcycles are sure to get a certain amount of moisture in the ignition switch
as well as every other switch on the handlebars. By design, this usually causes no problem for said switches. However, if you feel you must do something, I can't see where a small shot of WD40 would be a concern. IMO
 

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I use WD myself on countless bikes over the last 30+ years. If it didn't work or gave any issues I would probably have stopped by now. Full disclosure I don't do much rain riding but all my locks get the same treatment including truck/trailer/house/rv.

Not sure if you are aware but the "WD" in WD-40 stands for "Water Displacing" so an added benefit is that it displaces any residual water in your ignition whereas the graphite will stick and become a paste. I think the step that most people are missing with the WD is to blow out the ignition with an air compressor after spraying. Hold a rag over top because this can get messy, but it does an incredible job of cleaning out the ignition. A tiny shot of lightweight lube after blowing out the ignition and it works better than new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice, I ended up spraying my key with a water displacing lubricant that has a different name and wiped all the corrosion off the key with a rag. I then sprayed the key down and ran it in and out of the ignition a couple times. I like the idea of the air gun into the ignition afterwards, I'll give it a shot this weekend.
 

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I always keep a can of Houdini lock lube around. A little bit of that goes a long way, seriously, a few drops is all that's needed. I've been using the same single can I bought five years ago. It's what I've used on all my Kawasaki motorcycles, specifically for Kawi's crappy guaranteed-to-corrode locking gas caps. I also use it on outdoor padlocks.
 
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