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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just received this yesterday. See 2 attached photos!

This handlebar has the following features:

- Same standard 7/8” diameter at both ends as the OEM bar, but “fat” (1-1/4”) in the middle

- Has just slightly more than the EXACT amount of straight (not bent) bar at each end to accept ALL the OEM controls (levers, mirrors, brake cylinder, switch boxes, etc)

- Same overall width as the OEM bars

- GORGEOUS visual texture (the photos taken under household lighting cannot do it justice)

- Goes with my planned overall carbon fibre theme

- Direct from China, from order date to my hands, in just 13 days

- No duty or taxes due

- The ad seemed to say that it would weigh 299g = 0.66 lb, but that is incorrect. The actual weight on the digital scale is 0.36 lb (!!) The bare OEM handlebar apparently weighs 2.154 lb (I haven’t yet taken mine off to verify its weight myself, but that is what I am told it weighs). So, this bar saves 1.8 lb all my itself!

- $87 Canadian = $67 US including free shipping in VERY well padded foam & tape packaging!

Installation, usability, and durability testing will commence in a few days, but based on my very favourable long-term experience with the carbon fibre wheels on my Yamaha R3, I don’t anticipate any issues.


Jim G
 

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Why?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you have to ask, then you just don't get it and there's no point in trying to explain it . . . :)

Pick one or more:

- Helps me achieve my objective of getting my Z125 as far below 200 lb before gas as I possibly can, without spending really crazy money

- The 3-dimensional visual pattern texture is mesmorizing

- Because the quality is so good

- Goes with my visual design scheme

- Because it's a bargain if you understand normal Carbon Fiber pricing

- Because I can

:)

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So when are you planning on installing it? Please post pics after you get it mounted on the bike.
It's in my install queue! The Graves Carbon Fiber and Titanium exhaust system will go on first, probably on Sunday or Monday. Installation of the handlebar is not yet possible because the "fat" middle section of the bar requires a different set of mounting blocks than the smaller diameter OEM 22mm bar. This 1-1/8" "fat bar" configuration in the middle, coupled with standard 2mm bar "ends" is pretty standard on dirt bikes, and I have a set of Pro Taper 1-1/8 adaptor risers, made specifically for use on a Z125 or Grom, on order but not yet here. I do already have CNC aluminum, adjustable levers already in hand and will install them at the same time.

The handlebar will also have to have a small hole drilled for each of the LH and RH switchboxes, just like the OEM handlebar. Those holes accept "pins" that protrude from the switchboxes, and they are critical to keep the switchboxes from rotating on the bars (so you cannot simply cut the pins off the switchboxes).

The install is also complicated by the fact that the control cables and wiring on the bars will not allow mounting them after the handlebar itself has been installed - the cables and wires are too short. So, you almost need a buddy to hold things like the master cylinder handy and LEVEL (to prevent air induction into the brake line), while you move the BAR back and forth sideways, rather than move the controls, to slip all the controls onto each bar end without having to disconnect all the lines and cables and then re-install them, and re-bleed the brakeline! (Depends on the specifics of each bike model). So, I MAY need to schedule a day to do it with a buddy.

I will post photos when I have done it.

A number of other new parts are enroute. Stay tuned.

Jim G
 

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The install is also complicated by the fact that the control cables and wiring on the bars will not allow mounting them after the handlebar itself has been installed - the cables and wires are too short. So, you almost need a buddy to hold things like the master cylinder handy and LEVEL (to prevent air induction into the brake line), while you move the BAR back and forth sideways, rather than move the controls, to slip all the controls onto each bar end without having to disconnect all the lines and cables and then re-install them, and re-bleed the brakeline! (Depends on the specifics of each bike model). So, I MAY need to schedule a day to do it with a buddy.

I will post photos when I have done it.

A number of other new parts are enroute. Stay tuned.

Jim G
I've changed out the bars twice on my Z. The hardest part is usually removing the left grip.
Once the grip is off take the pinch bolt out of the clutch perch and use a flat bladed screwdriver to pry the slot open enough to allow the perch to slide easily on the bar (don't slide it off the bar yet). Unscrew (2 screws each) the left and right electrical switch modules and separate the halves. Pull 2 plastic wiring ties out of their mounting holes close to the left and right lower handlebar bends (the ties help route the switch module wiring). Now loosen the lock nut on the throttle cable adjuster and screw the adjuster all the way in. This creates enough slack to allow you to slide the cable end out of the throttle sleeve . Slide the throttle sleeve off the handlebar.
Next unbolt and remove the front brake perch (2 bolts). I don't worry about keeping it level.
I just let it hang by the brake hose. I've never gotten air in the brakes doing this and I don't see how air can get into the master cylinder and brake line as long as you don't pull on the brake lever. Moral of the story is don't pump the brakes until you re mount the master cylinder on the new handlebars. Finally, you can unbolt the actual handlebar clamps, move the bar to the right far enough to slide off the clutch perch, and reverse the steps to install the new handlebars.
2 final things to consider: First there are two wires running from the right switch module to the brake light switch on the master cylinder. You may want to disconnect them when you unscrew the module just to avoid putting strain on the wires. They just use spade connectors, so they pull off easily. Just don't forget to re connect them after the throttle tube, switch module and clutch perch are assembled on the new handlebars. Second, If you want to re use the wire guides that route the switch module wire cables along the handlebars you'll have to drill two more holes in the new bars for them.
Bottom line is that swapping out the handlebars is a one person job. It's tedious, but it doesn't really require two people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've changed out the bars twice on my Z. The hardest part is usually removing the left grip.
Once the grip is off take the pinch bolt out of the clutch perch and use a flat bladed screwdriver to pry the slot open enough to allow the perch to slide easily on the bar (don't slide it off the bar yet). Unscrew (2 screws each) the left and right electrical switch modules and separate the halves. Pull 2 plastic wiring ties out of their mounting holes close to the left and right lower handlebar bends (the ties help route the switch module wiring). Now loosen the lock nut on the throttle cable adjuster and screw the adjuster all the way in. This creates enough slack to allow you to slide the cable end out of the throttle sleeve . Slide the throttle sleeve off the handlebar.
Next unbolt and remove the front brake perch (2 bolts). I don't worry about keeping it level.
I just let it hang by the brake hose. I've never gotten air in the brakes doing this and I don't see how air can get into the master cylinder and brake line as long as you don't pull on the brake lever. Moral of the story is don't pump the brakes until you re mount the master cylinder on the new handlebars. Finally, you can unbolt the actual handlebar clamps, move the bar to the right far enough to slide off the clutch perch, and reverse the steps to install the new handlebars.
2 final things to consider: First there are two wires running from the right switch module to the brake light switch on the master cylinder. You may want to disconnect them when you unscrew the module just to avoid putting strain on the wires. They just use spade connectors, so they pull off easily. Just don't forget to re connect them after the throttle tube, switch module and clutch perch are assembled on the new handlebars. Second, If you want to re use the wire guides that route the switch module wire cables along the handlebars you'll have to drill two more holes in the new bars for them.
Bottom line is that swapping out the handlebars is a one person job. It's tedious, but it doesn't really require two people.
Thank-you, Spaceteach! These detailed instructions will help a LOT, and since you have done it twice, there should be no surprises for me!

The concern about the master cylinder is that unless the MC is completely full of fluid, there is air space. If the MC is inverted during the handlebar swap, the air spaces can become air bubbles that travel UP (because the MC is inverted, and it's just like air bubbles in water) into the brakeline fitting. I suppsoe you might have to be unlucky for that to occur, but why take the chance? I'll try to keep the MC upright during the swap.

Jim G
 

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Jim, The point I was trying to make is the master cylinder has seals. If the assembly is positioned so that air bubbles travel up from the reservoir to the cylinder, they still can't get in to it unless you break the seal (by operating the brake). When you re mount the master cylinder and it's back to being upright and level the air bubbles do their thing and rise back to the top of the reservoir where they belong, so as long as you don't pull on the brake lever until the assembly is re-mounted upright and level, air won't get in the line. The reverse of this is why some brake bleeding instructions tell you to use a zip tie to pull on the brake lever overnight to make sure the brakes are fully bled. This breaks the seal and allows any remaining air to rise and escape from the line.
At any rate, if you're more comfortable keeping the reservoir upright and level, go for it.

By the way, I just checked YouTube and found 2 videos demonstrating handlebar replacement. one was done by Fox Fader and the other was by TomAndToys. If you go to YouTube and search for Kawasaki Z125 handlebar replacement they should appear in the search results. At least they did for me.

By the way, in response to your comment about no surprises: I don't care how many times you do modifications to bikes, there are ALWAYS surprises ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jim, The point I was trying to make is the master cylinder has seals. If the assembly is positioned so that air bubbles travel up from the reservoir to the cylinder, they still can't get in to it unless you break the seal (by operating the brake). When you re mount the master cylinder and it's back to being upright and level the air bubbles do their thing and rise back to the top of the reservoir where they belong, so as long as you don't pull on the brake lever until the assembly is re-mounted upright and level, air won't get in the line. The reverse of this is why some brake bleeding instructions tell you to use a zip tie to pull on the brake lever overnight to make sure the brakes are fully bled. This breaks the seal and allows any remaining air to rise and escape from the line.
At any rate, if you're more comfortable keeping the reservoir upright and level, go for it.

By the way, I just checked YouTube and found 2 videos demonstrating handlebar replacement. one was done by Fox Fader and the other was by TomAndToys. If you go to YouTube and search for Kawasaki Z125 handlebar replacement they should appear in the search results. At least they did for me.

By the way, in response to your comment about no surprises: I don't care how many times you do modifications to bikes, there are ALWAYS surprises ;-)
Ah, thanks for the clarification about the seals! I'll find those videos too!

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I got word from my dealership parts guy that the lefthand grip is backordered until tomorrow, and then it will need to be shipped from Toronto to Vancouver Island, so he figures he won't have it for me until a week from now. :(

I need that lefthand grip to do the handlebar swap, as the grip is glued to the OEM handlebar and gets destroyed via attempted removal.

Jim G
 

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I got word from my dealership parts guy that the lefthand grip is backordered until tomorrow, and then it will need to be shipped from Toronto to Vancouver Island, so he figures he won't have it for me until a week from now. :(

I need that lefthand grip to do the handlebar swap, as the grip is glued to the OEM handlebar and gets destroyed via attempted removal.

Jim G
It's never a bad idea to have a spare grip laying around, but if you have a thin screwdriver you should be able to remove the left grip without damaging it. You just have to insert the screwdriver between the grip and handlebar and move it around the circumference of the bar. Start with the screwdriver inserted about an inch, rotate the 360 degrees, insert screwdriver further in, rotate, and repeat until you have the tip of the screwdriver almost to the end of the grip. Then twist and pull the grip. It helps if you leave the screwdriver inserted while you are twisting and pulling the grip.
The easiest way to remove a grip without cutting it is to blow compressed air between the bar and grip while pulling it off, but if you don't have an air compressor the screwdriver method is the next best way to do it.
 

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I got my grip off without a problem, as stated above a screwdriver worked fine to break enough of the contact cement to make it work. No glue used to put it on the new bar, just some glass cleaner to let it slip. I do have a new grip, but not stock, cost was like $10 for the pair and I bought them when I ordered the short throw KLX110 throttle tube, might have been Motion Pro brand, but I could wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
To get the grip off, I first need to get the bar end off, right?

How do I get the bar ends off the Z125 handlebar?

Jim G
 

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I slide my grip over the bar end, it was flush with the diameter of the bar on mine. You will need to remove the clutch and switch box to get in there. That's is, unless the glue job was poor and then you might be able to roll the grip towards the end, then spray a little glass cleaner or soapy water in there to help it slide. The glue on mine was junk and didn't really pose much of a challenge. Backup plan was to cut it since I had a new grip in hand but it wasn't needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I slide my grip over the bar end, it was flush with the diameter of the bar on mine. You will need to remove the clutch and switch box to get in there. That's is, unless the glue job was poor and then you might be able to roll the grip towards the end, then spray a little glass cleaner or soapy water in there to help it slide. The glue on mine was junk and didn't really pose much of a challenge. Backup plan was to cut it since I had a new grip in hand but it wasn't needed.
Ok! Sounds good!

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Newest complication: The Taper Pro "Fat bar" adaptor is somewhere in the Canadian Postal system, after having arrived from China Post. Canada Post workers are saying rotating strikes may begin Monday . . .

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Also, you can get the screwdriver in from the bar end, just roll it around inside to break the glue. Smaller screw drivers are better because they won't distort the grip as much.
And a smaller screwdriver is also probably less likely to rip the grip as a result, I would think.

Jim G
 
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