Kawasaki Z125 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
........I have just shy of 500 miles on the bike. Changed the oil and filter @ 200 miles. I do ride her hard up to redline, but I check the oil regularly. Oil level is at full on dipstick per oil level checking procedure in the owner's manual. Noise is a first for me tonight and has seemed to go away. Has anyone ever experienced this? Thanks.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
If you have more info' that would be good for the Motor experts here :wink2:
.
Here's a couple of threads on the same issue
.
https://www.z125owners.com/forum/ka...on/10177-z125-ticking-noise-normal-video.html
.
https://www.z125owners.com/forum/engines-discussions/15509-ticking-low-idle.html
.
https://www.z125owners.com/forum/engines-discussions/3585-ticking-sound-my-engine.html
.
https://www.z125owners.com/forum/kawasaki-z125-general-discussion/9793-ticking-top-engine.html
.
This link is a fast way to find specific problems and issues , as well as going to the bottom of each thread and reading the "Similar Threads" section
https://www.z125owners.com/forum/kawasaki-z125-how-diy/15545-tech-quick-index.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you!! I think it's a normal sound, it just seems to become more pronounced as the bike acquires miles. My bike sounds like a semi-loud sowing machine at idle, if that helps. Hopefully it's normal, sorry, it's my first thumper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
........I have just shy of 500 miles on the bike. Changed the oil and filter @ 200 miles. I do ride her hard up to redline, but I check the oil regularly. Oil level is at full on dipstick per oil level checking procedure in the owner's manual. Noise is a first for me tonight and has seemed to go away. Has anyone ever experienced this? Thanks.
Running the engine "hard' and "up to redline" with less than 500 miles on it was NOT a good idea, especially with an aircooled engine that has a total oil capacity of just ONE quart. It's possible that you have provoked the need for a valve adjustment. Hopefully, nothing worse.

Jim G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Along the line of the need for a valve adjustment:

Here is a PSA. I believe Kawi says something CRAZY like 6500 miles before first valve adjustment. I don't believe it for a second. Every other bike I've ever owned calls for it at initial break in service around 600 miles. Same on the Grom.

They are so ridiculously easy to get to I figured I'd check mine before my trip (my bike has about 1400 miles on it).

Intake was a touch too tight. Exhaust was in spec but at the extreme tight end. You guys may want to check yours, if for nothing else than piece of mind. Only takes 4 bolts to expose the valves, no fairing or gas tank removal. Just make sure you have a 9mm wrench. A garage full of tools and I had to run out for one. My set only had 8 and 10mm. And there is no SAE equivalent for 9mm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Along the line of the need for a valve adjustment:

Here is a PSA. I believe Kawi says something CRAZY like 6500 miles before first valve adjustment. I don't believe it for a second. Every other bike I've ever owned calls for it at initial break in service around 600 miles. Same on the Grom.

They are so ridiculously easy to get to I figured I'd check mine before my trip (my bike has about 1400 miles on it).

Intake was a touch too tight. Exhaust was in spec but at the extreme tight end. You guys may want to check yours, if for nothing else than piece of mind. Only takes 4 bolts to expose the valves, no fairing or gas tank removal. Just make sure you have a 9mm wrench. A garage full of tools and I had to run out for one. My set only had 8 and 10mm. And there is no SAE equivalent for 9mm.
Does the 9mm wrench have to be "offset" to get in there properly, or will a straight wrench work?

By the way, on the Yamaha R3, which has a twin 320cc engine that redlines at 12,500 rpm, the first valve adjustment interval is at around 24,000 miles! Which is GREAT, because its valvetrain is 4 valves per cylinder DOHC, with adjustment via shims, which requires breaking the camchain and removing both camshafts to change shims, and it's important to not drop the camchain or any shims into the crankcase during the process! We Z125 owners have it EASY in comparison, sonthere is no excuse for not doing the work!

Jim G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Jim that's crazy.

I have an old yamaha xj600s seca II air cooled inline 4 with 2 valves per cylinder with those **** shims. I don't have to break the chain or even remove cam shaft there a tool and camshafts have a place to rest it next to the lobes so when you rotate the motor it depresses shim basket and you can get the shim out with some tweezers.

I used offset wrench. Not sure if it was necessary but would make it easier for sure just because space is tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Jim that's crazy.

I have an old yamaha xj600s seca II air cooled inline 4 with 2 valves per cylinder with those **** shims. I don't have to break the chain or even remove cam shaft there a tool and camshafts have a place to rest it next to the lobes so when you rotate the motor it depresses shim basket and you can get the shim out with some tweezers.

I used offset wrench. Not sure if it was necessary but would make it easier for sure just because space is tight.
It's no longer that easy on most of the new bikes. Check out the service manual for the Yamaha R3! Scary. And very expensive when done at a dealership, but who has a complete enough set of shims even, or any of the required special tools, or the experienced skills, to do it at home anymore? Plus, you have to take off a BUNCH of body parts to even GET to the engine and then to the camshafts and shims.

I miss "the old days" where we rebuilt bikes and engines in people's garages or basements with readily available and inexpensive tools. :(

On my first motorcycle, a 1967 Suzuki T5 200cc 2-stroke, my college roommate and I removed the engine from the bike in about 90 minutes, and carried its engine to the local dealership on a city bus! Try that today . . .

Jim G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies. Does anyone have any knowledge of a good video that I can watch about adjusting the valves please?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Thanks for the replies. Does anyone have any knowledge of a good video that I can watch about adjusting the valves please?
I do not have a video, but just Google "Kawasaki Z125 valve adjustment". If you don't get anything that way, then Google "Kawasaki Z125 big bore kit installation", and find one that includes a modified or different cylinder head, as the installation of any kit that includes a modified or different head will include adjusting the (new) valve clearances of course.

Jim G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
That video is pretty good but you may need something a bit more if you have never done a valve adjustment before on any machine.

The Z has adjusting nuts, not shims so it is much easier.

You should watch Ka'wee's vid, then go on youtube and watch a bunch more to get a feel for it. Then re-watch the Z vid it will make more sense. An older ninja 250 has the same type of adjusting nuts as the Z, and before the latest gen they went for like 25 years without any changes so there should be a ton of vids on it. Skip the ones that mention shims, they don't apply here.

You need feeler gauges. Tough to describe how to use them... the gauge should slightly drag as you use it... not too too tight where you can barely get it in, not too loose where there is little to know metal to metal contact.

You will need to take the cover of the air box off (like when you remove the filter), not the whole box. It is like 6 or 8 screws, no big deal. Get the horn out of the way too... (1) 8mm bolt.

When you are done rotate the engine (2 times to get back to TDC) and double check your clearances to make sure they are good.

I always set valves to the looser end of the spec because they tend to tighten up over time. Take your seat off look at the base of the tank you will see the valve specs there. Don't confuse inches and mms.

One final tip... The 'T' mark may be aligned but you may not be at TDC of compression stroke (where you want to be to do the adjustment). Get the 'T' mark centered in the view port and wiggle the arm that has the adjusting nut on it. It should ever so slightly move. If it doesn't rotate engine another 360 degrees.

It takes some patience to find a good angle to get the feeler gauge into the intake valve. Exhaust is a piece of cake. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Greg- that's clever. Although I personally would want to verify with the gauges.

When you tighten the adjuster nut sometimes the clearance tightens a bit. You need to check afterwards. The clearances are so small I wouldn't trust myself to judge an 1/8 turn and remember the orientation to confirm it didn't move after tightening the adjuster. And gauges are like 3 bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
I verified a couple times, then stopped checking for my own uses. Where I do check with gauges is before I loosen the locknut, if it needs adjustment then I follow that procedure. The change is as simple as a single flat for quarter turn, or a flat to a point for the eighth turn. The locknut should only ever increase the clearance, it is pulling the adjuster away from the valve by the slop in the threads, generally these little thread pitches don't have a lot of slop. If they do have slop, you probably need to toss the rocker arm in the trash. That's been my experience with the clone parts in my KAYO, the replacement Yamaha parts have had much better tolerances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
I find tightening the lock nut tightens the clearance because it causes the adjuster to spin (and tighten). I will try this myself though the next time I need an adjustment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
You do need a wrench on the adjuster, several companies make something to do this, or just cut a piece of flat stock to grab two flats which is what I've been doing. Cut a notch in scrap piece of a stainless worm clamp band, it put up a fight for a decent length of time, need to make another cheap tool for this job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
You do need a wrench on the adjuster, several companies make something to do this, or just cut a piece of flat stock to grab two flats which is what I've been doing. Cut a notch in scrap piece of a stainless worm clamp band, it put up a fight for a decent length of time, need to make another cheap tool for this job.
I just ordered the Motion Pro tappet adjustment kit. It is a clever design that controls the adjustor while tightening the locknut. Its expensive in Canada - over $40 CDN, but includes everything you need to 8,9, or 10mm nuts with 3 sizes/types of adjustor heads, so absically can probably handle any valve adjsutment other than shim setups.

It is also shaped to get a perfect hold on locknut and adjustor, so no rounding of locknut corners or wrenches slipping off while tightening.

It apparently makes the job easy and exact, and that's what I like. :)

Jim G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
That tool would make the job easier for sure. I just used offset box wrench and some miniature spring loaded needle nose pliers 'cause that's what I had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
I really need to order that set, the KAYO is 8mm and square adjuster, the Z is 9mm and square. And maybe I should use the Kawasaki nuts on the KAYO since they are slightly larger and would provide slightly higher clamping force. At 10,000rpm those nuts tend to come loose on the KAYO which can cause all sorts of issues. So far nothing has been permanently damaged from the nut coming completely off.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top