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Inexpensive Smoku Chinese Rearsets Installation on Z125 – YES!

This posting describes my recent mini-project to install “Smoku” (Chinese) rearsets on my Z125. It describes why, the features, the negatives, the tools required for installation, the installation process, the outcomes, my overall summary opinion of the product, and 3 photos.



Summary:

For those who are impatient, these remarkably inexpensive rearsets are well made, look good, save some weight, work VERY well, and move the quality of gearshifting to a whole new plane of precision and smoothness, especially when coupled with adjustable hand levers (Later I will publish a posting on another Jim G mod that includes adjustable hand levers).



Why:

The stock positioning of the both the handlebar and the footpegs and foot controls on the Z125 tends to push the rider forward and upright just a bit more than I prefer. In addition, the OEM components used in the footpegs and foot controls look big, clunky, and frankly cheap. They are also surprisingly heavy (3.50 lb including hardware, which is a LOT on a bike that weighs just 212.3 lb before fuel. (The OEM foot controls on the 345 lb Yamaha R3 weigh a bit less than these clunky Z125 foot contols!). So, a set of rearsets that change the riding position, look more to scale on the tiny Z125, look more elegant, and save some weight, are desirable, especially if the price is right.

Which brings us to price: For anyone who has dropped his/her Z125 and needs replacement foot controls for one or both sides, the Smoku rearsets also are a bargain compared to OEM Kawsaki replacement parts – the entire Smopku set, that does both sides, sells for $110 Canadian = $85US, on Amazon, including shipping to your door!

Kawasaki likely pushes the rider forward as much as they do no the Z125 for a defendable reason: The Z125 is tail-heavy from the factory (53% rear and 47% front), and putting a rider onto the seat – ANY weight of rider – makes the bike even more tail heavy.

However, the position that Kawasaki forces the rider into is a little much, and by forcing the rider’s legs and bum as far forward as it does, it has the unintended effect of (a) making the rider into a prominent upright “sail” for the wind to catch, and (b) makes the OEM seat less comfortable than it would be if a bit more of the rider’s weight were transferred onto the handlebars. It also makes racing the Z125, or doing gymkhana events, pretty much impractical without first changing both the handlebars and the footpegs/controls.

Finally, the OEM Z125 foot controls were chosen by Kawasaki with a tight budget in mind, so they don’t really work “precisely” and “crisply” and “smoothly”. There’s too much friction and too much play in them. Since I have good aftermarket foot controls on my Yamaha R3, I KNEW what I was missing on the Z125, and I wanted what was missing.

The Smoku rearsets are an interesting “positional compromise” as far as rearsets go. Most rearsets target racers as the buyers, and so move the foot controls rearward and upward to shift more weight onto the arms and allow a lower tuck position, and to improve cornering ground clearance. But, the somewhat adjustable (4 positions to choose) Smoku rearsets position the footpegs 4" to 5” rearward of OEM but 1” to 1.5" LOWER than OEM. The rearward movement of the pegs transfers more weight onto the handlebar, moderates that OEM upright position, and gives taller riders a bit more room. The lower height recognizes that the Z125 is not a roadracer, and gives tall riders even more room, and requires less of a knee bend to get to the pegs.

The Smoku rearsets look WAY better than the OEM components, they improve rider positioning and weight distribution without forcing you to try to look like a roadracer, they weigh a lot less than the OEM components they replace, they are WAY more precise than the OEM parts, and the price is really, really right compared to traditional rearset prices (which are typically $300 to $450US).

So, given all of the above, I placed an Amazon order.



Features:

The Smoku rearsets have all the right features:

CNC machined

6061 aluminum

Your choice of 8 anodized colours

Knurled footpegs with ¼” “break at” holes, which encourage the footpeg to break at a specific point if the bike is dropped, so that you can get home on the remaining usable footpeg “stub”

Actual weight on my digital scale = 2.55 lb, but only 2.41 lb if you, like me, don’t use the included heel guards, because they are unnecessary on the Z125 and they make body panel removal harder. This means you are removing 1.09 lb from the Z125.

Choice of 4 mounting positions for the footpegs on each side

Double stainless steel ball bearings for both the brake and gearshift levers, which makes for low effort, smooth operation of both brake pedal and gear shift.

Quality spherical joints at both ends of the shift rod

Does NOT require changing to a pressure switch for rear brake light activation

Uses the OEM brake cylinder connection, brake pedal spring, and brake light switch spring

All hardware is included

The rearsets are as fully assembled as they can be right out of the box. No intricate assembly is required

A letter-size drawing is included that makes installation very easy. Easy is a relative term – I mean compared to most other rearsets! The installation is actually pretty easy if you have the correct tools and good 3D visualization.

Shipping time from Asia to my door in Canada was reasonable: about 2 weeks, which is maybe 3 days longer than items I order from The U,S.

And, the price is sure right!



Negatives:

The weight is a little high compared to some domestic rearset offerings (The Attack performance rearsets on my Yamaha R3 weigh just 1.9 lb versus the Smoku 2.41 lb., and the Attack performance weight includes the Carbon Fiber heel rests provided with it. With the aluminum heel rests and the bolts provided by Smoku, if you did mount the heel rests, you’d be at 2.55 lb, which is 34% heavier.

The visual appearance isa BIG improvement over OEM but does not quite achieve the “elegance” of the Attack rearsets.



Tools & Supplies required for installation:

Z125 key (to remove the seat)
Loctite (To secure bolts against loosening in use)
Hex wrench set (All the fasteners in the kit have hex heads)
Lithium grease – aerosol (to pre-lubricate the bearings and other moving parts)
Lithium grease – tube (to pre-lubricate the bearings and other moving parts. Some parts are best lubed with aerosol while others need to be done from the tube)
Long Philips screwdriver (to hold footpegs against rotation while installing their mount bolts)
12mm socket (To remove OEM mounting bolts)
Ratchet
3” ratchet extension (To keep the ratchet away from adjacent parts while turning it)
3/4” x 1/16” diameter s.s. cotter pin (to replace the cotter pin which is removed from the rear brake cylinder activation rod pin during installation)
Needlenose pliers (To remove the cotter pin and then install a new cotter pin)
Torque wrench NOT required – just use Loctite and tighten to point of harder resistance plus a TINY bit more.



Process:

Lubricate all moving joints with Lithium grease – spray or tube, as appropriate.

Use the needlenose pliers to disconnect the OEM heavy / large brake pedal spring that pulls the rbake pedal back up after you stop braking.

Use the needlenose pliers to disconnect the OEM light / small spring that activates the brake light switch.

Do NOT remove the cotter pin from the brake cylinder stirrup yet (see below).

Remove OEM RH foot control (includes footpeg, brake pedal, and mounting plate) by removing the 2 12mm OEM bolts using the ratchet, 3” extension, and 12mm socket

Rotate the brake cylinder stirrup so you can SEE the cotter pin holding the brake lever to the stirrup, and remove the cotter pin using the needlenose pliers.

Loosen the TOP 12mm locknut on top of the stirrup.

Rotate the BOTTOM 12mm nut INSIDE the stirrup to enable moving the stirrup DOWNWARD. You are trying to lengthen the activation rod for the brake cylinder, so that the rear end of the brake lever pivot arm can reach the activation rod. The OEM position for the end of the activation rod is too high for the Smoku brake lever pivot arm to reach it once the Smoku assembly is bolted onto he motorcycle. You will need to move the activation rod stirrup downward about ¼” or so by simply unthreading that “inside” nut.

Once you have the correct length of activation rod, tighten the locknut on TOP of the stirrup.

Connect the Smoku brake lever pivot to the stirrup via the OEM cross pin, but do NOT install the cotter pin yet, because if you lengthened the activation rod stirrup position too much or too little, the cotter pin is a bear to remove!. Note that you will need to rotate the Smoku aseembly backplate to an odd angle to get clearance to insert the cross pin. After inserting the cross pin, rotatet the backplate back to the correct orientation.

Install the RH footpeg into the Smoku backplate into your desired choice of position (pick 1 of 4). This must be done BEFORE installing the backplate, as the bolt is too long to install from the inside! Use the long Philips screwdriver through the “break point” hole in the footpeg, to “hold” the footpeg while you tighten the mounting bolt.

Install the 2 SMOKU recessed hex head 20mm long mounting bolts into the same 2 holes you removed the OEM mounting bolts from, to fasten the RH rearset to the motorcycle. Use Loctite.

Install the brake pedal onto its keyed tapered shaft, and secure with the bolt provided by Smoku for it. Do NOT overtighten this bolt. It is unnecessary, as the shaft for the brake pedal is keyed. If you go crazy with the torque you apply, you will break the bolt.

Connect the OEM brake pedal return spring to the forward hole on the brake pivot arm, using the needlenose pliers.

LENGTHEN the adjustable length of the brake light switch so that the spring for the brake light switch can also reach the forward hole in the brake arm pivot. You need to lengthen it enough that it reaches the hole in the brake pivot arm withOUT pulling the plunger out of the switch at ALL until the brake pedal is actually pushed down. If it pulls the plunger more than a very minimal amount with the brake pedal “up”, your brake light will ALWAYS be “on”! Use the Z125 ignition key to test the brake light activation. The brake light switch is adjusted by rotating its bottom portion while HOLDING the TOP portion so that the top portion does not also turn and break the wires coming to the swtich.

Connect the OEM spring from the brake light switch. Be gentle with it. Use the needlenose pliers and try not to turn the spring into spaghetti. It is somewhat fragile

Check brake activation & brake light activation by depressing the brake pedal. To test whether the brake pedal is actually activating the brake cylinder, you need the bike to be on a rear stand. Start rotating the wheel with your left hand and then depress the brake pedal with your right hand. You have to press HARD with the right hand to actually stop the wheel, as the pedal is normally activated by your leg which has all your body weight and muscle working on the pedal. You want to ensure that (a) the brake does activate and (b) that the brake does NOT activate when there is no downward pressure on the brake pedal. This is important. You want the brake to work, but you also don’t want it “on” all the time while you are riding!

Adjust location of brake pedal fore or aft to suit yourself (3 available positions), & then Loctite the pedal bolt

Now insert the cotter pin into the stirrup on the brake activation rod and bend the end so it cannot slip out. This is a little awkward to do since the cotter pin is on the Inside of the stirrup, but it is reasonably accessible from underneath the LEFT side of the bike, especially since the bike should be on a rear stand.

Now, on the LEFT side of the bike;

Disconnect the OEM gear shift linkage rod from the OEM (black) shift link

Remove LH OEM foot control assembly (2 bolts).

Install the LH footpeg into the Smoku backplate into your desired choice of position (pick 1 of 4). This must be done BEFORE installing the backplate, as the bolt is too long to install from the inside! Use the long Philips screwdriver through the “break point” hole in the footpeg, to “hold” the footpeg while you tighten the mounting bolt.

Install the Smoku assembly with Loctite, using the 2 “long” LH mounting bolts with their 2 spool sleeves through LH rearset and into the Z125 frame.

Install with Loctite the rear bolt on the gear shift linkage rod. Do NOT try to adjust the llinkage roid yet or to tighten the locknuts yet.

Install the 45mm long bolt through the front spherical rod end of the linkage rod, spacer, and shift link (in that order), and into the provided locknut. Do NOT over torque that locknut. It will NOT loosen if simply threaded gently, because it is a nylon locknut inside. If you over torque it, you will strip it very easily. You want it snug so that the linkage rod does not rattle or move out of position when you use your foot to shift up or down, as that would make your shifting feel “sloppy”, but you don’t want to over torque.

Adjust the location of the gear shift pedal fore or aft to suit you (choice of 3 positons), & then Loctite the pedal bolt

If necessary, or if you just want to, you can adjust the height of the gearshift pedal by adjusting the linkage length (note LH thread on one end!)

Secure the 2 locknuts on the linkage rod when you are satisfied the gearshift pedal is where you like it.



Outcomes:

What a difference good foot controls make! Especially when coupled with good quality adjustable hand levers, which I installed during the same rainy period while waiting for better weather!

Shifting and braking are WAY better feeling now, and the shifting, both shifting up and downshifting, is IMMENSELY better. Crisp, precise, low effort, and smooth. Perfect!

As for position of the footpegs, I found that the lowest and most forward of the 4 position choices works well for me. It works so well that I never “noticed” the position of the footpegs while riding. For reference, I am 5’ 8” in height, have a 29” inseam, and wear 34” shirt sleeves.

One glitch, which is almost certainly my fault: I must have forgotten to do the final tightening and Loctiting on the bolt that holds the brake footpedal “tip” in place (By “tip”, I mean the rubber “tip” that bolts onto the end of the pedal, not the pedal “arm”). I say this because somewhere near the end of my first ride with the Smoku rearsets, I lost that tip and the bolt that holds it on! I know I initially mounted that bolt with only light torqueing, as I wasn’t sure which of the 3 mounting holes would work best for me, and I think I simply forgot to remove the bolt, apply Loctite, and torque it into place after doing my test “fitting” on the bike.

So in one of the photos below, you will see the brake pedal arm but not the rubber “tip”. I will need to find a suitable replacement tip and bolt, which I hope won’t be too hard, since most rearsets, no matter the source, seem to use tips for both the brake and gearshift that appear to be either identical or very similar.



Summary:

The quality is great, the weight is low, installation is on the easy side for rearsets, the action is precise and smooth, they look good, and the price is a steal in the rarified world of rearset pricing. Pretty hard to go wrong in choosing these rearsets. Just remember to Loctite and torque the pedal tip bolts!



Photos:

One photo shows how the rearset kit arrived from China. Note how everything is sealed for protection against scratches in shipping. Note also that an excellent diagram is provided which makes installation relatively easy and fast.

Another photo shows the left (gearshift) side of the Z125 after installation.

The third photo shows the right (brake) side of the Z125 after installation. You can see the brake lever return spring and the brakelight activation spring if you look carefully. You can see where the brake pedal “tip” is missing after I lost it somewhere on my ride.

In both the left and right side photos, you can see the indented area with 2 bolt holes where the heel guards would mount if I had used them. On the Z125 though, they would make removal of the body panels more difficult, and bike washing more difficult, and rreally are not needed because the bodywork keeps your heels safely away from any moving parts.

Jim G
 

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I installed the same set the only flaw that really really bugged me enough to remove them is the leverage point of the brake arm is so small it requires lots of force to apply the rear brake making it next to impossible to trail brake properly.
 

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Those rearsets are the same rear sets sold by all the Chinese sellers and they are horrible. A terrible thought out design with several flaws. I bought them myself and was going to throw them in the garbage, then I sold them to someone for about half what I paid for them.

There are several negatives you're leaving out of your list, but the two big ones are: one side sticks out further than the other side due to the spacers, and the shift linkage has a long thin spacer that twists under torque, making bad OEM shifting feel even worse.

The other negative is the fasteners included are so low grade it's what we engineers in the industry call "butter bolts". If I were going to use these, and for a moment, I was, I had planned on throwing out all key fasteners and replacing them with grade 5 stainless steel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Those rearsets are the same rear sets sold by all the Chinese sellers and they are horrible. A terrible thought out design with several flaws. I bought them myself and was going to throw them in the garbage, then I sold them to someone for about half what I paid for them.

There are several negatives you're leaving out of your list, but the two big ones are: one side sticks out further than the other side due to the spacers, and the shift linkage has a long thin spacer that twists under torque, making bad OEM shifting feel even worse.

The other negative is the fasteners included are so low grade it's what we engineers in the industry call "butter bolts". If I were going to use these, and for a moment, I was, I had planned on throwing out all key fasteners and replacing them with grade 5 stainless steel.
I cannot feel any difference in how far each side sticks out.

I find the shifting to be much BETTER than the OEM!

The bolts don't need to be Grade 5 for their applications on this product. There are modest shear loads and no cantilever loads, and it's cantilever loads that require more metal strength.

I do agree that the brake pedal leverage is on the short side and thus requires more force, and would indeed make fine control of trailbraking notably harder for a racer.

Jim G
 

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Mine were a better grade, they gave no hint of being made out of cheese. There are some negatives, but then we are not paying $400 for Woodcraft either.

My biggest gripes are this:

#1 the rear brake, enough said as we've talked about why. I'll fix this eventually.

#2 I keep stepping on the shift lever pivot because it sticks out pretty far. Not sure there is a fix for this.

Because it uses Heim joints, there may not be a reason to keep that big spacer on the shift shaft, but I'm not getting a huge amount of deflection right now. Might be worse if you preload the shifter, then bang it into gear. Haven't had mine on the track, so I may grow to hate it too. If I hate it, I'll have to design my own.

As far as the sticking out on the left side, I'd need to compare to the stock shift mechanism and peg, it may not stick out much past the stock parts. But I agree that the spacer could be a weak part, but there was no other way to move them back without removing the plastic cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mine were a better grade, they gave no hint of being made out of cheese. There are some negatives, but then we are not paying $400 for Woodcraft either.

My biggest gripes are this:

#1 the rear brake, enough said as we've talked about why. I'll fix this eventually.

#2 I keep stepping on the shift lever pivot because it sticks out pretty far. Not sure there is a fix for this.

Because it uses Heim joints, there may not be a reason to keep that big spacer on the shift shaft, but I'm not getting a huge amount of deflection right now. Might be worse if you preload the shifter, then bang it into gear. Haven't had mine on the track, so I may grow to hate it too. If I hate it, I'll have to design my own.

As far as the sticking out on the left side, I'd need to compare to the stock shift mechanism and peg, it may not stick out much past the stock parts. But I agree that the spacer could be a weak part, but there was no other way to move them back without removing the plastic cover.
I agree that with the Helm joint, the spacer MIGHT not be absolutely necessary, and removing it might take out a point of potential deflection. But I have 2 reasons to NOT take it out:

1. It would likely slightly degrade the precision of the shift, as the link rod would then be at a notable horizontal angle

2. i NEVER use "force" to change gears, either up or down. With the right clutch lever position in 3D space (achieved via adjustable levers), a partial versus full clutch lever pull, and the right clutch-throttle coordination, there is no "force" required! Just a buttery smooth and fast shift. "Banging" is completely unnecessary and avoidable.

And yes, NO rearset design can pull the left side rearset inward any further, as it will hit the Kawasaki bodywork. Pushing the RIGHT side rearset outward "to perfectly match" the left creates a very bad "cantilever" in the brake pedal cross-shaft, which (a) causes frictional binding and (b) weakens the brake pedal which is subject to huge foot forces during hard braking.

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
This scares me.


However, it looks like @mnnthbx has a shift lever that addresses this. I am considering trying to find someone to order one for me. Does anybody (here) have any experience with this?



https://mnnthbx.com/product/mnnthbx-shifter-for-kawasaki-z125-pro/
That MNNTHBX shift lever requires a footpeg position that is WAY forward! It is not intended to be used with rearsets! Notice in your photo the FORWARD OFFSET "beartrap" pedal being used with it (probably for offroad riding).

Why does the Smoku shift arrangement scare you? Do you fall or drop your bike a lot? If so, then yes, don't spend the money on rearsets, unless you also race your Z125, in which case you pretty much have to have rearsets of some sort.

By the way, the Smoku footpeg would hit the pavement long before the gearshift helm joint and spacer do since the footpeg sticks outward way further, and even if the footpeg hits the pavement and BREAKS, it has a designed-in "weak spot" that results in breaking off the "tip" of the footpeg, which still oeaves enough of a stub to (a) continue to ride and (b) protect the Helm joint and spacer. Then, even if you somehow break off the footpeg stub, you STILL have the gearshift lever itself which sticks out further than the Helm joint and spacer and so again protects it.

Jim G
 

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The mnnthbx images I found were quick examples. I didn't think the lever moved the position that far forward... but I haven't seen it in person (maybe @mnnthbx has a good picture of this on a bike).


My concern is that you have turned the gear selector into a giant lever. If you crash, it probably wont touch the ground, but if it does, its going to be MUCH easier to break stuff you have to split the case to fix. But what do I know... I just write software.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The mnnthbx images I found were quick examples. I didn't think the lever moved the position that far forward... but I haven't seen it in person (maybe @mnnthbx has a good picture of this on a bike).


My concern is that you have turned the gear selector into a giant lever. If you crash, it probably wont touch the ground, but if it does, its going to be MUCH easier to break stuff you have to split the case to fix. But what do I know... I just write software.
The helm joint, spacer, and threaded bolt are deliberately FAR, FAR too weak to transmit any destructive force to the transmission. Your fears are groundless.

Again, the whole point of the extended spacer is to make the linkage rod as parallel as possible to the axis of the bike. This is what makes for a great shifting action. The designer knew what he was doing.

Jim G
 

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The helm joint, spacer, and threaded bolt are deliberately FAR, FAR too weak to transmit any destructive force to the transmission.

Jim G
That's a good point, might prevent shift shaft damage in a crash. And if you run this in reverse shift (GP shift), that spacer is no longer out in the way because you'll need to rotate the linkage around to be much higher. I don't have any pictures of this, but it is in my video.
 

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The helm joint, spacer, and threaded bolt are deliberately FAR, FAR too weak to transmit any destructive force to the transmission. Your fears are groundless.

I agree in principle, but I'm just not that lucky. When I crash, the stuff that is supposed to break away, ends up being the strongest part of the system. Case in point. Laid my SV down. Pegs have slots to break away so the whole bracket doesn't snap... But the bracket snapped.


 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I agree in principle, but I'm just not that lucky. When I crash, the stuff that is supposed to break away, ends up being the strongest part of the system. Case in point. Laid my SV down. Pegs have slots to break away so the whole bracket doesn't snap... But the bracket snapped.


What unfortunately often happens is that a part that is not the one that sticks out furthest gets broken because either the designer or a person repairing the "sacrificial" part has used a moutning BOLT on the sacrificial part that is far too strong for the application, and so the sacrificial part either does not break OR the sacrificial part breaks but the bolt does NOT and the bolt transmits the force to the INNER part that was supposed to be protected!

Or, sometimes when a bike has fallen and is "somersaulting" along the ground, a rock or other surface debris "catches" on a normally protected part and breaks it or tears it off. Rearset designers cannot design for such occurrences, and they mainly design their rearsets for racetrack use, where there are no surface obstructions allowed.

Jim G
 

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This scares me.
You got that right. Horrible design. You have a cantilevered arm on a cantilevered arm. It flexes so bad that after a ride around the block and snapping a few hard shifts, I immediately started taking the rearsets off and coming up with my own linkage mod for the OEM setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You got that right. Horrible design. You have a cantilevered arm on a cantilevered arm. It flexes so bad that after a ride around the block and snapping a few hard shifts, I immediately started taking the rearsets off and coming up with my own linkage mod for the OEM setup.
Your shifting style must be something unique if you got that much flex! Proper shifting does NOT require force at all. :)

And, there is NO "cantilever" in this linkage design. Look carefully at the photo. The linkage rod is supported withOUt cantilevering at BOTH ends!

The only "cantilevers" are the actual rubber toe pad on the shifter and the footpeg, and those cantilevers exist on EVERY rearset and OEM foot control ever made, because otherwise you can't get a foot in there to shift, and nobody wants training wheels at the end of their footpegs!

Do you perhaps work for a company that makes the $400 rearsets and hates to see lower priced but good products competing against them? Because that's sure what you sound like.

Jim G
 

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There's nothing wrong with my shift style. The Z125 is known by many to have shifting issues because the shift shaft and the shift arm flex. Quite a few of us, myself included have come up with DIY solutions. These rearsets make the problem worse, not better.

I don't work for a company that sells expensive rearsets. I'm not happy with any of the expensive options around and if you were to read my build thread you'd see I've decided that OEM was the best option, with some cheap footpegs.

I managed to improve the feel of the shifting with a Gcraft shift shaft bracket and a DIY inside mounted hyme joint that reduced the twisting leverage on the shift arm.

I think the funny thing here is that you wrote a huge book on how awesome some rearsets are that are pretty well known to not be very good. It's ok if you like them but most who have tried them don't.
 
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