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Discussion Starter #1
So... anyone have a clever idea to support the bike without wheels on?

For rear I plan to rest both sides of swingarm on piece of plywood on CMU block.

For front... I have a heavy bag hanging in the garage, I have taken it down and used it's hook to hang straps to triple trees in the past for heavier bikes with no problem. But it is kinda wobbly, and I would prefer to take both wheels off at once, I have never done that and don't think I will with the front danglin' in the breeze. I need to change tires.

Like a CHUMP I don't have a stand... if I bought a HF stand will it work on front and back? I don't have the mount things that clip on to the plate in back of center stand where chain adjuster nuts are, are they required? Need to do this tonight so no time to order anything... I'll get crafty with 2x4s if I need to. Thanks guys.
 

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Posted this in the stem lift thread, but FortNine did the hanging "stand" with a ladder and jack stands (flip your pegs). Pegs on jackstands are basically really crude spools, so it should be a bit more stable than 2x4's under the swingarm.

Only one of the Zs has spools right now so this is how I'm planning on doing my bike's tires.

Video Here
 

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Dirty bike lift under (stock) exhaust?
This method is @Kaw'ee approved, just stay towards the rear to avoid bending the header.

To answer your other question (Will HF stand lift both ends?)
It's looking like... "No"

I'm looking at stands on HF and the Pittsburgh Spool stand actually looks pretty solid, but I'm not certain if it comes with the swingarm pads despite being pictured lifting a bike with them. If you are making the trip you should be able to poke around in the packaging to look for them. The Haul-Master stand has the flat pads to lift under the swingarm, but not the finger style attachment to lift the front fork.

General consensus is that you shouldn't use a fork-lift stand to remove the front wheel anyway, though it seems possible if you're careful.

I'm not seeing a front stand anywhere on HF's page, so if you go that route, expect it to only support the rear.
 

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Suspending the front by the bars is probably fine while pulling the front tire off. If you want more stability while tires are being mounted, why not run a bar through the axle hole in the forks and prop the front up on jack stands. That will help prevent anything from happening while you are out. Just don't prop the front up without anything holding up the rear.


Without rear spools, this is how I prop up the rear of my bike.



I'm looking at stands on HF and the Pittsburgh Spool stand actually looks pretty solid, but I'm not certain if it comes with the swingarm pads despite being pictured lifting a bike with them..

I have the Pittsburgh Spool stand and it works great on the Z with spools but does NOT come with swing arm pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Gentlemen, thanks for all the advice!!

It is my luck I will crunch the header if I use the exhaust as a jack point. I'm going to go with the CMU/plywood in back (very similar to Crackerjac's setup) and take Ando's Fortnine ladder tip for the front.
 

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As mentioned in the other thread... I have a fork stand from My KAYO and have removed the front wheel using it, but it is super sketchy with HIGH probability of dropping it. If you chose to do this, put the axle back in and put the nut on the end, the fork will tend to twist and slide sideways to all out of the stand.

Jack stands under the swing arm and ladder with straps is going to be my next method if I ever get time to work on the poor neglected thing. Want to get the Kenda tires on there. The bead breaker (rim scratcher) should be here soon and need to try it out.

Th HF aluminum rear stand is decent, but don't push it sideways when the bike is on it, it is not that strong in that direction. The paddles kind of suck, would be better if the stand was stronger. Might need to weld the stand together which should make it much stronger. New welder should be here tomorrow.

Tip on aluminum TIG welders... If you ever see the Hyl brand come back, be very careful. Mine is still busted, the importer is gone, and way outside of Amazon return window. Money in the trash! Bought a Primeweld TIG225x, at least this guy is based only 8 hours away and I'll go knock on the door if I get screwed again! One of the popular welding channels on Youtube still has one of these set up, if it lasts for him, should work well for me. https://primeweld.com/products/primeweld-tig225x-225-amp-igbt-ac-dc-tig-stick-welder-with-pulse-ck17-flex-torch-and-cable-3-year-warranty

My Hyl review is now the top critical review on Amazon, not that you'll find any of them for sale https://www.amazon.com/HYL-TIG-200P-AC-DC-DIGITAL-Welder/product-reviews/B072WJNTT2 If anyone in China near this manufacturer reads this, and you feel like contacting them, see if they will get it touch with me to fix this thing. They are off the shelf control boards, I just need to know which boards to buy!

And if you are in Florida, and feel like stopping by the IWE store (the scum that sold me and jerked me around on the welder), feel free to have a few choice words with the people still working in the other business in that building.

By Phone: (941) 208-4292

By Mail:

PO Box 224 Tallevast, FL 34270

For sales inquiries : [email protected]

For service inquiries: [email protected]

Can't find the building address right now, the above info is from the google cache.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The bead breaker (rim scratcher)
Lol

Sorry to hear about your welder Greg. Hope the new one works out for you. I bought a Hobart Handler 190 mig welder about a year ago, I've used it on a dozen projects and I really love it. Kind of expensive but all metal drive gear and built to last. I have a spool gun for it and it can shoot stainless wire but I will eventually be looking into a smaller tig. Still need more practice.
 

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@MrEvilpirate

You get your tires on last night?

I did 1 of 4 and I was already sick of it. I figure I can do one per night and spread out the torture... Or, hopefully I'll get better at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah got em on. These are much easier than the bigger ones. I know what you mean. I was sweating a bit. And swearing. It does get easier once you do a few of them though. Last night the biggest hinderance was myself... garage is an absolute mess which makes it a lot harder to work. Like it is a challenge to get from one side to the other with all the crap I have in there prepping for the trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Honestly my biggest issue is the disaster that is my garage. All 22' of work bench is filled and there is no floor space left with the trailer and two cars in there, the bikes, typical yard equipment and all the camping crap.

BUT....

speaking of lube. I used a much stronger soapy water mix this time... maybe 1:4 dish soap to water. It actually took some effort to get the soap to dissolve into the water. It made the job much easier (last time it was way weaker... still slick but not like the new mix). Do not under estimate the importance of adequate lube. And Kaw'ee's trick about zip tying one side of the tire to the rim to get the other side farther from the edge of wheel for removal... that's a good trick.

Setting the beads was a piece of cake. My last set of tires shipped with tight straps around them so the edges of the tire (beads) were trained to move into the center. Was a real pain. I got the new rubber from J&P, arrived 2 days after I ordered, and it came wrapped up in plastic, so they weren't distorted from shipping. The front was effortless, I couldn't believe it. Had some trouble with the rear, one side wouldn't pop. Ratchet strap around the circumference of the tire took care of it.

Every time I do this it goes like this:

1. OK, let's install these tires, this will be great, I'll save a some cash!
2. (starts wrestling with tire) man this sucks why the F do I put myself through this
3. (half way through) man I should really buy some legit tire tools other than a couple of irons
4. (all done) that wasn't too bad.

lol

I also couldn't find my valve stem removal tool after looking at it like every day for a year, as it hung from my pegboard just waiting until it was time to do some tire work, which was a real bummer. Took a Dremel to a flat head bit and made my own. I'm sure I'll find it now that I don't need it anymore.

EDIT:
One last thing re: lube. I was reading something, or watching a video, I don't remember, but the guy was talking about a conversation he was having with an old timer about changing tires. The old guy was telling him to spray the tire and rim with soapy water. The younger guy was asking about other products to use instead of soapy water. The old guy's response was "This is the easy part. Don't make it hard". At that point I was like "sold" on soapy water.
 

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Do you guys have proper lube?
I got two little bites out of the stock tire, got my irons and rim protectors very stuck... and realized I had forgotten something. XD

I started with a mostly empty bottle of Windex to get the IRC tire off and thought it worked really well. I ran low so I made a water/soap mixture and while I think my ratio worked fine (1:4 sounds crazy soapy!) I had a hard time keeping the spoons on the slippery rim protectors and my lube evaporated away due to my pre-heated tire. The unwanted slip may have been an artifact of me applying the lube with the rim protectors in place (because the tire had dried).

First time ever doing a tire change (bicycles don't count, that's cake) and it went... OK. Removed some paint from my rim because I needed to get an iron in place NOW and didn't have a spare protector. Owell, live and learn, I'm going to chop up a few spare oil containers for round two. It's just as much of a PITA as everyone says, but the convenience makes it worth it for me.

I'd like to try some zip ties and a purpose made lube and see how much easier it can be.

Agreed on bead setting, my tires were packaged well (they wanted to be wider than my wheel), I threw a strap around the outside just to make life easier, spray everything down, and both sides popped around 10psi. Easiest part of the process by a country mile.

Putting the rear wheel back on would have been much more enjoyable if the adjusters/spools I purchased over a month ago had arrived. =/

OH! Anyone considering the MotionPro Rimshield II... Don't buy them for small wheels, they hang up on your sprocket/rotor and cannot reliably be inserted/removed. The material is obscenely tough however. Highly recommended on a 17" wheel, just not these little buggers.
 

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Z125 front end support made out of a spare chunk of 2x6 in 5 minutes because I don't want to buy yet another front end stand.

The sides are cut at an angle so the bottom of the forks sit flat, and then a stop is wood glued / screwed in to keep the forks from sliding off. Works fine for changing tires.

Of course when I have to do something like remove the forks or replace the steering stem bearings, I'll hang the front end with a couple straps under a ladder.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Zaph that right there... that is the simple little trick I knew was out there that I was missing. Great idea.

The ladder didn't work out for me. My 8' had cross bars too low that got in the way, it was too much of a hassle to get the 12', so I screwed a 2x6 to the ceiling hitting 2 different joists then put a hook into the 2x6 and hung a tow strap.

One of my buddies needed a tire changed yesterday. I told him take it off the bike and bring it over along with some beers. Had it off and on within 10 minutes. Every time I do it it gets easier and easier. This is really something were youtube is a great asset but is no substitute for experience.

Ando I wish I took a picture of my soapy water bottle. The water looks like orange Gatorade from all the dawn in it. Really worked great as lube. I scratched my rims a bit too. But no scratches on my friend's wheel... I used plastic strips cut from an old oil container. I think the real difference was that by the time I did my friend's wheel it was fresh in my mind. I didn't mess around with the irons a lot... every bite did something and no real wasted effort. The longer you mess around with the irons the more likely you are to scratch your wheel.

My solution to minor wheel scratches is some black touchup paint the dealer gave me when I bought my Frontier.
 

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Zaph I was going to build a little chock/trough/riser thing for winter storage, but I think I'm going to copy your design now, looks more stable and while resting on wood all winter is a heck-uva lot better for the tire than resting on concrete, hanging in the air is even better.

Cheers!

My solution to minor wheel scratches is some black touchup paint the dealer gave me when I bought my Frontier.
Oh, I totally used a Sharpie, but I'm trashy that way. ;] I plan to go back with paint sometime, really just a bandaid to cover my shame. =/

Glad to hear it gets easier, I definitely had a lot of wasted effort trying to figure out how far I could move each bite, or losing ground on the opposite side of the wheel (oops).

@riptide_wave: Janky solutions are kinda the theme here, looks good to me. (Looks like a spool stand in rear to stabilize?)
 

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Zaph I was going to build a little chock/trough/riser thing for winter storage, but I think I'm going to copy your design now, looks more stable and while resting on wood all winter is a heck-uva lot better for the tire than resting on concrete, hanging in the air is even better.
If any of you guys want to build this little support, it's 2x6 wood, 1.5x5.5 actual. The low side is 10.75" to the corner and the high side is 13.5" to the point. For the middle spacer cut a 5-5/8" long piece and screw it in with long screws, and use plenty of wood glue also to keep it stable. The little add-on stop on top to keep if from sliding off is 2" long.

The angle matches the bike's rake when it is up on rear stands using the Area 22 style rear spool end caps, but should be close enough for other rear lift methods.

To get the bike up on this, I use a little board laid in the middle of it to roll up on it and lift with leverage. I have the bike front end on this in 10 seconds with little effort.
 
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