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Im also at about 2500 miles.

Weird considering I bought my Z after my Grom. I have racked up more miles on the Z. Kind of says something about the bike. LOL
 

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@Bryan Krae has a speedo for sale with 9XXX miles. I think that's a new winner if those miles are real. Anyone else want to update their totals?

On a similar note, what would everyone consider a high mileage Z125 considering they spend most of their life at WOT and a larger than average portion of it on one wheel?
 

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Derp. I was envisioning the pickup being internal, measuring RPM and doing some math to figure out speed... Re-read your post and the pickup is on the front sprocket. THAT makes much more sense.
 

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To say that the pickup or sensor is on the front sprocket would not be accurate. The sensor as was said reads the output or what can be known as counter shaft. it is on the back of the case
 

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To say that the pickup or sensor is on the front sprocket would not be accurate. The sensor as was said reads the output or what can be known as counter shaft. it is on the back of the case
Yes, that's an important clarification. The sensor may be on the same shaft as the front sprocket, but it's actual sensing device is INside the case to read the shaft rpm, and NOT in any way dependant upon the number of teeth on the sprocket. Which leads to an interesting set of circumstances:

The sensor's reading is dependent only upon engine rpm and what gear the bike is in. So, when you change the front sprocket size, you don't change the sensor output. But that's the problem. Because when you reduce or increase the size of the front sprocket, you change the rpm of the rear wheel, which reduces or increases respectively the distance the wheel covers per second, and so the actual speed of the bike becomes lower or higher respectively THAN WHAT THE SENSOR STILL BELIEVES THE ROAD SPEED TO BE. THAT's why your speedo will then read higher or lower respectively than actual.

In "the old days", speedometers were typically cable driven off the front wheel, so gearing changes did not make the speedometer read too high or too low. But inserting a cheap sensor, and running a set of wires to it, is cheaper than providing a speedometer cable housing at the front wheel, a cable (that breaks from time to time), and room within and around the speedometer to run and attach the cable. And, "correction" of an inaccurate speedometer was much more difficult (required either a mini speedo cable gearbox or removing and reworking the mechanical speedometer). So, the manufacturers changed over to sensors, and it's, overall, probably a good thing,

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think I win....or loose. Im not sure. But so far other than my number plate cracking and falling off, its been completely trouble free. My clutch has recently been getting questionable so ill be changing that.

****, nice! So about $160 gas spent in total haha... ;)
 

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$35 for a clutch kit and a couple hours of your time is pretty reasonable. Schedule it around an oil change because you will need to drain the oil or lay the bike on it's side to swap out the clutch plates. Several good videos on youtube of how to change the clutch plates, and I think Hard Racing or Man in the Box had the best price and an optional gasket. It was a Tbolt KLX110 upgrade kit and I know I got it from one of the advertisers here because it was easy to order and I knew I would get the right pieces. The gasket is like $5.00 or $10.00usd, just go and add it so you don't need to worry about wrecking the old one.

The only real special tool you should have is a deep well socket for the flywheel nut, if you watch my video you can see why.
 
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